TRAPPED BY ASTHMA?

HAVE YOU:

Been supplied more than 2 courses of oral steroids for asthma in the last year?1-3
Been to the emergency department or hospitalised in the last year for asthma?2

DO YOU:

Use your reliever inhaler 2 or more days a week?*1-3
Wake at night due to asthma symptoms?1

*Excluding when you use your reliever to prevent symptoms before exercise.

UNCONTROLLED ASTHMA CAN MAKE YOU FEEL TRAPPED4

WHY IT’S TIME2REVIEW
YOUR ASTHMA PLAN

Think frequent asthma symptoms and attacks are a normal part of life? They’re not. You shouldn’t have to feel trapped by asthma.

To make sure your asthma control is the best it can be, it’s important to discuss your asthma regularly with your GP. Even if you think you’ve tried everything, your asthma can change over time and so can the management options.

Below are some signs that your asthma may be uncontrolled that you shouldn’t ignore.

Been supplied more than 2 courses of oral steroids in the last year?1-3

Oral corticosteroids (OCS) – not to be confused with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) – are medications prescribed by a doctor to treat an asthma attack by quickly reducing inflammation and swelling in the airways.6 While they are an important tool in managing asthma in certain cases, they should be used carefully and like all medications can have side effects.6

One of the signs your asthma management needs to be reviewed is taking more than 2 courses of OCS in the last year.1-3 That means being given OCS on more than 2 occasions. So if that’s you, it’s recommended you see your GP for an asthma review.

Been to hospital for asthma in the last year?2

If you’ve had to visit the emergency department or been admitted to hospital for an asthma attack in the last year, it’s another sign that your asthma may be uncontrolled.2 The more recently and frequently you’ve been hospitalised, the more important it is you visit your GP for an asthma review.1

Use your reliever inhaler more than 2 times a week?1-3

Asthma is treated using preventers (to help prevent asthma symptoms) and relievers (to help control asthma symptoms when they appear).5 Everyone who has asthma needs a reliever inhaler (asthma puffer) for times when they have asthma symptoms.5 The aim is to use the lowest dose to control symptoms.6

If you use your reliever inhaler too much, it could mean that your other asthma medications (your preventers) need to be changed.1 But how do you know if you’re relying on your reliever inhaler too much? Using your reliever inhaler 2 or more days a week (excluding when you use it to prevent symptoms before exercise) can be a sign your asthma is uncontrolled.1-3

Wake at night due to symptoms?1

How are you sleeping? It’s a question everyone with asthma should be asking themselves regularly. When asthma interferes with your sleep, it’s another way it is telling you it may be uncontrolled.1 Experts recommend that anyone who experiences asthma symptoms during the night or asthma symptoms upon waking should visit their GP for an asthma review.1

ARE YOU READY TO REVIEW?

HOW2REVIEW
YOUR ASTHMA PLAN

Book an Online Doctor today from the comfort of your home with Australia’s 24/7 service.

Be prepared to discuss how asthma is affecting your life. Here’s a checklist to discuss with your GP.

Call your GP today or find a GP near you and make an appointment online.

Visit Asthma Australia to access an Asthma Educator, available to answer questions and provide support.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT ASTHMA CONTROL?

FIND OUT MORE

Here are a few places where you can get more information:

Asthma Australia

Asthma Australia is the peak body for people with asthma, providing information and support to help them to live free from the restraints of asthma.

National Asthma Council

The national authority for asthma knowledge and setting the standard for asthma care in Australia

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

Latest statistics on how many people have asthma in Australia and the effects of asthma on Australians